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Mexican Bobcat — EN
Population Estimate: unknownRange: Canada, U.S., MexicoPrimary Threats: Hunting, Habitat loss
The Mexican Bobcat is considered the most heavily hunted and traded cat worldwide.
Solitary and nocturnal
Very small, only about twice the size of a house cat.

Mexican Bobcat — EN

Population Estimate: unknown
Range: Canada, U.S., Mexico
Primary Threats: Hunting, Habitat loss

  • The Mexican Bobcat is considered the most heavily hunted and traded cat worldwide.
  • Solitary and nocturnal
  • Very small, only about twice the size of a house cat.
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rhamphotheca:

The Imperial Woodpecker (Campephilus imperialis) is – or was – a member of the woodpecker family Picidae. If it is not extinct, it is the world’s largest woodpecker species at 56-60 cm (22-24 in) long. Due to its close relationship and similarity to the Ivory-billed Woodpecker, it is sometimes also called “Mexican Ivorybill” but this name is also used for the Pale-billed Woodpecker. The large and conspicuous bird has for long been known to the native inhabitants of Mexico and was called cuauhtotomomi in Nahuatl, uagam by the Tepehuán, and cumecócari by the Tarahumara…
(read more: Wikipedia)    
(image: at Wiesbaden Museum of Natural History, by Fritz Geller-Grimm)

rhamphotheca:

The Imperial Woodpecker (Campephilus imperialis) is – or was – a member of the woodpecker family Picidae. If it is not extinct, it is the world’s largest woodpecker species at 56-60 cm (22-24 in) long. Due to its close relationship and similarity to the Ivory-billed Woodpecker, it is sometimes also called “Mexican Ivorybill” but this name is also used for the Pale-billed Woodpecker. The large and conspicuous bird has for long been known to the native inhabitants of Mexico and was called cuauhtotomomi in Nahuatl, uagam by the Tepehuán, and cumecócari by the Tarahumara

(read more: Wikipedia)    

(image: at Wiesbaden Museum of Natural History, by Fritz Geller-Grimm)

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Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat — CR 
Population Estimate: 115Range: Australia, now exists only in a preservePrimary Threats: Competition with livestock, habitat loss, invasive plant species, shallow gene pool
Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat — CR 

Population Estimate: 115
Range: Australia, now exists only in a preserve
Primary Threats: Competition with livestock, habitat loss, invasive plant species, shallow gene pool

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Galapagos Penguin — EN
Population Estimate: 1,ooo-4,oooRange: Galapagos Islands, EcuadorPrimary Threats: human disturbance, fishing accidents
small penguins.
adapted to heat; they release excess heat through their feet and swim to cool off from the sun.

Galapagos Penguin — EN

Population Estimate: 1,ooo-4,ooo
Range: Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
Primary Threats: human disturbance, fishing accidents

  • small penguins.
  • adapted to heat; they release excess heat through their feet and swim to cool off from the sun.
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Palawan Peacock Pheasant — VU
Estimated Population: under 10,oooRange: Palawan Island, PhilippinesPrimary Threats: Habitat loss, hunting
although their population is on the decline, they breed well in captivity.
they are a protected species and some inhabit St Paul’s Ntl. Park.

Palawan Peacock Pheasant — VU

Estimated Population: under 10,ooo
Range: Palawan Island, Philippines
Primary Threats: Habitat loss, hunting

  • although their population is on the decline, they breed well in captivity.
  • they are a protected species and some inhabit St Paul’s Ntl. Park.

(Source: earthsendangered.com)

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Tasmanian Devil — EN
Population Estimate: 10,ooo- 25,oooRange: Tasmania (Australia)Primary Threats: Devil’s Facial Tumor Disease, shallow gene pool (low diversity), cannibalism
This devastating disease caused the species to decline from 150,ooo in the 90’s to the present estimate. Cannibalism increases transmission.
In the past, the Devils were highly persecuted and killed on the basis of predation on domestic animals. They were considered “pests”. At one time, 5,ooo were poisoned annually.
Introduced predators, such as dogs and foxes, as well as road-kill also contributes to decline.

Tasmanian Devil — EN

Population Estimate: 10,ooo- 25,ooo
Range:
Tasmania (Australia)
Primary Threats:
Devil’s Facial Tumor Disease, shallow gene pool (low diversity), cannibalism

  • This devastating disease caused the species to decline from 150,ooo in the 90’s to the present estimate. Cannibalism increases transmission.
  • In the past, the Devils were highly persecuted and killed on the basis of predation on domestic animals. They were considered “pests”. At one time, 5,ooo were poisoned annually.
  • Introduced predators, such as dogs and foxes, as well as road-kill also contributes to decline.
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Pere David’s Deer — EW
Population Estimate (CAPTIVITY): 2,oooNatural Range: ChinaPrimary Threats: Hunting, habitat loss
Large reserves have caused population growth
In 1993, the world population was only 120

Pere David’s Deer — EW

Population Estimate (CAPTIVITY): 2,ooo
Natural Range: China
Primary Threats: Hunting, habitat loss

  • Large reserves have caused population growth
  • In 1993, the world population was only 120
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Mallee Emuwren — EN
Population Estimate: 2-4,oooRange: AustraliaPrimary Threats: Drought and wildfires (related to climate change), severe fragmentation 
Takes 3-4 years for a population to recover from a fire

Mallee Emuwren — EN

Population Estimate: 2-4,ooo
Range: Australia
Primary Threats: Drought and wildfires (related to climate change), severe fragmentation 

  • Takes 3-4 years for a population to recover from a fire
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Kirtland’s Warbler — NT
Population Estimate: 3,oooRange: Bahamas, U.S., Canada, BermudaPrimary Threats: Competition from Cowhead birds, Habitat loss
Although habitat loss was a primary threat, recent conservation efforts have quadrupled the local population in Michigan.

Kirtland’s Warbler — NT

Population Estimate: 3,ooo
Range:
Bahamas, U.S., Canada, Bermuda
Primary Threats:
Competition from Cowhead birds, Habitat loss

  • Although habitat loss was a primary threat, recent conservation efforts have quadrupled the local population in Michigan.
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Red Crested Tree Rat — CR
Population Estimate: Unknown; sparseRange: ColombiaPrimary Threats: Habitat loss, climate change, industry (coffee)
Purchase Shade-grown, fair trade coffee!:http://www.urthcaffe.com/organic.html

Red Crested Tree Rat — CR

Population Estimate: Unknown; sparse
Range:
Colombia
Primary Threats:
Habitat loss, climate change, industry (coffee)

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Reef Manta Ray — VU
Population: Unknown, decreasingRange: Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian OceansPrimary Threats: Over-fishing, trade, entanglement with boats
In 2009, the Manta genus was split into the Reef and Giant Manta Ray.
Wingspan of 7 m.

Reef Manta Ray — VU

Population: Unknown, decreasing
Range:
Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans
Primary Threats:
Over-fishing, trade, entanglement with boats

  • In 2009, the Manta genus was split into the Reef and Giant Manta Ray.
  • Wingspan of 7 m.
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Green Eyed Bushfrog — CR
Population: UnknownRange: IndiaPrimary Threats: Habitat destruction; industry (tea, eucalyptus)
All of the population is located in one small area.

Green Eyed Bushfrog — CR

Population: Unknown
Range:
India
Primary Threats:
Habitat destruction; industry (tea, eucalyptus)

  • All of the population is located in one small area.
G'day, Love love love this blog, thankyou for reppin' the cause and spreading the good word about our valuable species. We seem to have a common goal :). Anyway just wanted to leave you some good vibes!!

Haha, you’re sweet, thanks! :) Definitely can always use some encouragment. It’s really cool to see how a lot of people care about animals. More than I thought. So thank YOU for reading! :)

this is one of my new favorite blogs. keep up the amazing work!

That really means a lot! Thank you! It’s great to know others care. :)

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Przewalski’s Horse — EN
Population Estimate: 2,oooRange: MongoliaPrimary Threats: Habitat loss, hunting, climate change
Extinct in all of its natural range; extinct in the wild until it was reintroduced to Mongolia
When in contact with domestic horses, hybridization is a concern. They can produce fertile offspring.
They shed their mane and tail yearly.

Przewalski’s Horse — EN

Population Estimate: 2,ooo
Range:
Mongolia
Primary Threats: Habitat loss, hunting, climate change

  • Extinct in all of its natural range; extinct in the wild until it was reintroduced to Mongolia
  • When in contact with domestic horses, hybridization is a concern. They can produce fertile offspring.
  • They shed their mane and tail yearly.